tiamatschild: A painting of a woman leaning over a railing to set a candle in a lamp (Everyday Devotion)
Good morning, good morning, the little birds say!

Feed me, feed me, the little birds say!

Jazz station, jazz station! the little birds say!

I'm having breakfast have breakfast with me! With me! The little birds say!

What can I say, she definitely keeps me on track.
tiamatschild: Painting of a woman resting on a bridge railing - she has a laundry bag beside her (Default)
*hefty sigh*

oooooor I could struggle with suicidal ideation over accidentally bonking my cat in the head as I climbed into bed for over an hour and then have extremely disrupted sleep full of nightmares and intrusive thoughts and random crying jags with panic attacks again once I woke up.

Argh.

*writes more postcards*
tiamatschild: A print of a figure with a blue umbrella, walking away along a path in the rain (Walking Home with a blue umbrella)
Events in solidarity with Charlottesville are, in some places, continuing Monday or Tuesday - especially in smaller towns and more rural areas. I noticed between checking last night and checking this morning, several more events go up on the Indivisible register.

A link to Indivisble's search widget for finding an event near you.

So if you couldn't find one yesterday or even earlier today, and you haven't been able to register one yourself for any of the myriad of reasons that might be so (if you have been able to I figure you're pretty busy right now).

Feel free to take another look. Some places are slower off the starting line than others, and some groups hold more than one event at more than one time!

EDIT: I mention this the way I do because one of the things that happens to me with my OCD is that I'll set weird arbitrary time boundaries on things, and then sometimes I get confused and think they're real. So I've got to remember they're not. And remind myself they're not.

EDIT II: And also because um. I've been working very hard to get myself to a space where I can be in situations more crowdy than "two employees and two fellow customers in the small discount grocery" and I think I maybe am doing well enough to manage a vigil. Or at least to. Make the attempt.
tiamatschild: Painting of a woman resting on a bridge railing - she has a laundry bag beside her (Stopping By Woods On A Sunny Afternoon)
I went on a walk this evening in the twilight and saw the crescent moon, and Jupiter, and a bat!
tiamatschild: Painting of a woman resting on a bridge railing - she has a laundry bag beside her (Default)
My grandpa is doing better! He's stable and the hospital is transferring him to a rehab facility for the rest of the treatment he needs.

He's much much better.

I'm so relieved and glad, I keep crying at nothing.
tiamatschild: Painting of a woman resting on a bridge railing - she has a laundry bag beside her (Stopping By Woods On A Sunny Afternoon)
My grandpa has been in the hospital for a week, and last night my aunt called and said that he's taken a bad downturn and Grandma thinks all the children should come out.

So Mom and Dad threw a suitcase each together and took off in the truck. They'll be there in a few hours.

I'm close to my dad's parents.

ETA: This side of the family is my dad's side of the family - the grandfather I'm close to. (My mother's parents died when I was in my teens.)
tiamatschild: A painting of a woman in a chiton hanging washing on a line (Hanging the Washing Out to Dry)
I have all my posts and all my comments from all the years of tiamatschild on livejournal backed up in an archive journal here on DW. (Except for the very last few comments from the turn of the year to when I stopped crossposting.) I need to get it arranged and set up and linked and stuff, so that I and other people can find things on it, and so that the entries that weren't public aren't and all that. But it exists and if Livejournal does start deleting journals of people who haven't accepted the new TOS, as it looks like they might be doing (or journals that don't fit some arbitrary definition of "activity" or whatever it is, it being impossible to know for sure, since communication is no longer a thing!) that will still all exist.

If anyone was worried about that. I know I've had some lengthy brainstorming and worldbuilding conversations in comments with some of you over the years. So.
tiamatschild: A painting of a woman in a chiton hanging washing on a line (Hanging the Washing Out to Dry)
Yesterday was the first day of the library's summer reading program, and also the first day you could sign up!

I signed up.

(I think this new trend towards programs that are online so you can only sign up once the program starts is kind of dubious - especially since it means you really can't sign up in person or anything. hey do have handouts for the wee-est littlest ones though, so I guess that's something? I don't know, it just seems counter to a reading program's community building functions to me. But maybe I'm wrong! There might be boatloads of literature on this I just haven't read.)
tiamatschild: Painting of a woman resting on a bridge railing - she has a laundry bag beside her (Default)
...Helping my mother bathe abandoned stuffed animals in the bathroom sink.
tiamatschild: A painting of a woman leaning over a railing to set a candle in a lamp (Everyday Devotion)
On Sunday I went to the last of a series of conservation workshops I've been participating in as a volunteer. We've been evaluating and stabilizing the condition of a very diverse collection of historical medical texts.

My last book of the day - my last book of the workshop series! - was a frankenbook. I'd been working on a section of very fragile books packed in tight together all day. Some of them were missing covers and had their spines broken. Some of them were pamphlet bound to begin with, with paper covers barely to not at all heavier than their textblock pages. I'd found some interesting stuff. A textbook of psychiatristry from Turkey from the late 1930s, autographed by the author. The papers presented at the first conference of Geographical Medicine in Geneva (in French, German, and English).

But the last book... I thought at first it was another pamphlet bound medical text from the 1880s. A number of publishers sold these cheaply, largely through mail order, in the latter half of the 19th century and into the early 20th. They're very flimsy and the type is cramped - they often don't even have a proper title page. Instead they'll have the title and author and publisher given on the upper half of a page, with the start of the preface underneath for the second half of the page. There's always multiple pages of advertisements. Originally they sold for five cents each: if you wanted, say, a solid cloth binding with stitches instead of staples, you'd need to pay more in the neighborhood of a dollar fifty, and it went up from there if you wanted leather or what have you.

It wasn't until I got it back to the table and (very very carefully) opened it up that I realized it wasn't one cheap pamphlet bound medical text - it was six! Someone had gone to a lot of trouble to get those pages flush, and had even made a spine to cover over the six spines bound together.

People who study manuscripts call that kind of thing a 'miscellany'. They're very common in Medieval and even Early Modern books - people would bind together a group of short works that interested them into a size of book that they felt was 'reasonable', that was an aesthetically appealing size and shape. They become less common the closer you move to the present, and I'd actually never seen one from the 1880s before.

I wonder why the person who went to all that trouble did it? It was a very odd assortment of texts. They ranged from 1875 to 1883. There was one that was a surgical manual, and one that was a primer on women's health, and one that was a student's manual of "venereal diseases" and, which seemed most out of place to me, one of the Asylum Reform Society's pamphlets on how to construct and furnish an effective and humane mental hospital. I say it seemed the most out of place to me because the others, including the volume on proctology, were the sort of things a general practitioner might need on a fairly regular basis in the usual course of their practice. It makes sense to me that you might want them all together and easy to hand. But generally, if one does need to choose a suitable site for a new hospital, there's some warning beforehand. It's not the kind of thing life springs on you suddenly and on the regular.

Unfortunately, who ever had put this miscellany together had chosen to bind it with metal wire, which was now rusting, so I marked the book down for As Soon As Possible attention and copied out all the bibliographic data for each book, and recorded the whole as "miscellaneous medical texts."

I have so many questions! I know I'll never get the answers to them, most likely, but I have them, to turn over in my head and contemplate on. Who was the person who put the books together? How did they choose? Did they do that to more texts from their library? What was the reasoning behind their method? What kind of practice did they have? How did the person who donated the books to the academic collection they belonged to come by them? Was it the same person who bound them together? Why in the world did they scratch out the original "5 cents" publisher's price marks and write in in heavy red pencil "100 cents"?
tiamatschild: Painting of a woman resting on a bridge railing - she has a laundry bag beside her (Default)
Also, this is a stupid problem to have but my bed is covered in library books and I am having trouble figuring out how to fix it so I can get under the covers.
tiamatschild: Painting of a woman resting on a bridge railing - she has a laundry bag beside her (Default)
So it turns out that the problem with wearing a halter top dress you don't need to and really kind of can't wear a bra with to a celebratory open air lunch on the first really warm day of spring, before all the awnings and shade umbrellas are up yet is - - -

Well, when you're as pale as I am, the resulting sunburn is an interesting shape (you can see the bow I was wearing at the back of my neck on my skin!) that unfortunately makes wearing a bra while it heals pretty much pretty uncomfy!

Heck with it. Eight in the evening is a perfectly respectable time of day for pyjamas.
tiamatschild: Painting of a woman dancing a circle dance - she is smiling, her hand outstreched (Woman in Blue Dancing)
I read the hard copy version of Katie O'Neil's Princess Princess, with the exclusive epilogue today! And oh gosh, it's so great. It's amazing how different reading it all at once instead of having to wait a while for each new page or even just while each page loads makes the pacing feel different but not at all in a bad way!

And the epilogue is adorable. I enjoyed it so much.
tiamatschild: A painting of a woman leaning over a railing to set a candle in a lamp (Everyday Devotion)
May the Force be with you on this May the fourth!
tiamatschild: A painting of a woman in a chiton hanging washing on a line (Hanging the Washing Out to Dry)
On Thursday I had another psychiatrist appointment, and afterward, as a reward (I'm terrible at rewarding myself, but I am working very hard at getting better at it and all related forms of being kind to myself) I stopped off at the nearby local free zoo with non-releasable native wildlife again.

It was a good visit - the cooper's hawk decided I was too interested in their breakfast and carefully took it away to the back of their enclosure, one of the rescue big desert tortoises was very near mutiny because it's been so warm that they'd had had lots of time outside in their big outside field, and they did not believe it was too cold this morning for desert tortoises! (It really was too cold for desert tortoises.) And I spotted one of the prairie chickens! Always a treat - they like to hide. But the really surprising thing was when I left, on the road in front of the visitor center, I spotted a killdeer!

It spotted me at about the same time. We stared at each other for a moment. And then it went tippa tippa tippa toe running across the street and across the grass. Nope! Not today, Monkey!

(I wasn't gonna chase it, but I did watch it out of sight, because they have the most interesting gait.)
tiamatschild: A painting of a woman in a chiton hanging washing on a line (Hanging the Washing Out to Dry)
I just used the week's last two bananas, which were getting somewhat overripe, to make sourdough banana bread.

So now the kitchen smells like banana rum!

EDIT: Sourdough Banana Bread (From Mrs Stankey, via Don and Myrtle Holm)

1/3 C shortening
1 C sugar [this is actually a bit on the sweet side for me - I used 1/2 C brown sugar, packed, last night and that worked well, so I am planning on experimenting a bit more, with a bit less sugar, but I'm the only one who thought the 1 C white sugar versions were a bit too sweet, so]
1 egg
1 C mashed bananas [or however many you happen to have - I haven't measured.]
1 C sourdough starter
2 C flour [the recipe calls for all purpose - I've used half white all purpose and half whole wheat all purpose in all my renditions and it's not been too heavy ever]
1 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp vanilla or 1 tsp grated orange rind [I haven't tried the orange rind yet, due to never having oranges in the house when I'm making it, but I mean to!]

Pre-heat oven to 350 F. Grease a 9x5 loaf pan. Cream together the shortening and the sugar. Add egg. Mix until blended. Add in bananas and sourdough starter. Add orange rind or vanilla. In separate bowl mix flour, salt, baking powder, and soda. Add flour mixture to first mixture, stirring until just blended. Pour into the greased loaf pan. Bake at 350 F for about an hour or until a toothpick comes out clean. [And then it says Cool Before Slicing, but I haven't done a good job of that ever. Ahem.]

(From The Complete Sourdough Cookbook, Don and Myrtle Holm, The Caxton Printers, Caldwell Idaho, 1982. ...addendums in parenthesis added by this blogger.)

Huh.

Apr. 19th, 2017 09:18 am
tiamatschild: A painting of a woman in a chiton hanging washing on a line (Hanging the Washing Out to Dry)
The provenance of cheap paperbacks is always interesting. Apparently at some point in its life, my Penguin Books copy of the A.T. Hatto translation of Wolfram von Eschenbach's Parzival was sold at NYU's campus bookshop.
tiamatschild: A painting of a woman leaning over a railing to set a candle in a lamp (Everyday Devotion)
Speaking personally, I think the loveliest thing for a rainy cloudy foggy gray day is a really good local public jazz station, played at a volume where you can really focus on the music if you want to, but can also drift off to focus on Important Other Things as needed.
tiamatschild: A painting of a woman in a chiton hanging washing on a line (Hanging the Washing Out to Dry)
Yesterday after my psychiatrist appointment I went to one of the little local free zoos with nonreleasable native wildlife and watched all the birds eat breakfast.

Well, I say all the birds. All the birds had breakfast available, but the owls were mostly blinking slowly and wondering why the hour of half past ten in the morning existed and, if it had to exist, why they had to have breakfast at it. What is wrong with two am, they would like to know? A much more civilized hour.

The turkey vulture who lives with two bald eagles was super into their mice, though. It ate the tails first.
tiamatschild: Painting of a woman resting on a bridge railing - she has a laundry bag beside her (Default)
I heard the sandhill cranes again today!

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